Business Presentations – 7 Tips For Highly Effective CEO Presentations

Business presentations are a frequent part of the CEO’s life. Do you make a speech and make a difference? When you incorporate these 7 tips for highly effective CEO presentations, you can be sure that your speaking is making a difference.

Tip #1: Put the audience first.

Ask yourself what the audience wants you to talk about, rather than thinking about what you want to talk about. Asking yourself “What is on the minds of the people who will be in my audience?” will lead you to a highly effective presentation.

Options: what they are worried about, what troubles they are having or how they feel about things that are going on within the company.

Tip #2: Articulate a clear and specific call-to-action to deliver at the end of the speech or presentation.

Information is widely and easily available, so you must go beyond giving information. What do you want the audience do after they listen to you?

Some options:

  • Take a particular action that can be measured and evaluated
  • Change their thinking about something
  • Renew their enthusiasm and commitment for a specific outcome or result

Tip #3: Surprise them with the first words out of your mouth. Avoid the standard “Thank you for being here” or “Thank you for coming to hear me” or “Today we’re going to talk about…”

Grab them with a story, a provocative question or a challenge. Some options:

  • “What would you do if you were in charge of meeting next quarter’s financial goals?”
  • “Imagine you are meeting with the auditors tomorrow. What would be on your mind?”
  • “‘Your company has great products but terrible customer service. ‘ That harsh comment came from a dozen of our best customers. It’s hard to accept what many people think about us. What can we do to change this view?”

Tip #4: Be real

People like people who are genuine. Genuineness is easy to understand and decipher. The perfectly written speech read word for word is not genuine. It slides right out of the minds of the audience.

Tip #5: Be sure your speech is perfect for listening to

As a well-educated professional, you have great writing skills. You write with excellent sentence structure, word choices and perfect grammar. Your long sentences are constructed with just the right words connecting phrases and clauses. Your writing is literary and a pleasure to read.

Audiences do not have the leisure that readers have to go back, read something again, pause and think, and make notes. Audiences have only one chance to get your message as it moves past their ears at a steady pace.

Keep the limitations of listening in mind when writing the notes or text for your speech. Make your notes with the same fits and starts of spoken conversation. Use familiar words and keep sentences short and in the active voice.

Tip #6: Get out from behind a lectern.

Do not ask for nor accept a lectern or podium. These separate you from the audience when you should be doing everything possible to get close to them.

Require a hand held wireless microphone or a lavaliere microphone, rather than one that is fixed to a podium.

If you’re nervous without a lectern, practice enough to reduce your nervousness. If you need to have notes, prepare neat note cards and hold them in your hand.

Tip #7: Be scintillating every time on every subject for every audience.

Even though you’re the CEO and command attention due to your position, you will gain immeasurable respect through great speaking and presentations.

Time to prepare is always an issue. Shorten your preparation time by using a speech development system for every speech or presentation. My speech development system has 5 simple steps:

  1. Describe the audience’s mindset in 10 words
  2. Write your call-to-action close
  3. In a few words each, articulate three key points that drive to the call-to-action
  4. Select some leading materials to make your key points attractive and interesting
  5. Write an attention-getting opening that ties to the call-to-action.

Avoid power point slides. The audience will be glad and you’ll be able to devote the time you do have to your content and your preparation.

Private Lending Program For Real Estate Investors – Pros and Cons of Group Presentations

Part of this program is we’re going to be doing a whole teleseminar course on defining your private lending program, meaning all of the various factors that are involved, not just interest rates. Obviously, that’s part of it. You want to know the terms that you’re going to use. Are you going to short-term, long-term? Are you going to offer different pieces of collateral, just real estate, or personal pledges, or all the various other pieces that might be involved?

Loan to Value Ratios

We’re going to talk about loan to value ratios. What loan to value ratios are you going to lend up to 7% to 80%. Believe me, there are 10 or 15 different elements that you need to think through and work through to develop your unique private lending program. It might be similar to mine. That’s up to you, but it will be a program that is yours, and you need to think it through. As part of that call I will probably give you a number of pieces of homework that you would do.

You would address all these various issues so at the end of those calls, you would have a very well-defined private lending program that you could then talk to other people about and tell them, “I’m going to offer this interest, this term, this collateral,” and just go down the list of various pieces that you’re going to offer private lenders.

Group or Individual Presentations

Are you going to do group presentations or individual presentations? You need to figure out what your strength is. If you’re comfortable talking in front of groups, that’s wonderful. That’s a very powerful way to get started. If you can talk to elderly groups, professional groups, accountants, any of these types of things, small groups of 5 people, 10 people, you can get up to 20 or 30 people. Just try to get in front of as many people as possible.

Obviously though, most people are not going to be interested in your program but a few will and those are the few, once you’ve identified them, you need to kind of nurture those people along and develop those relationships.

Figure Out What Works for You

Group speaking is something some people are comfortable with. Others are not. That’s fine. You need to figure out what works for you. If you want to do one-on-one or smaller networking types of relationship meetings, that’s fine. Again, as I said I have migrated from group meetings to one-on-one meetings. I’ve just found it better. I find my closing ratio is much higher when I can do a one-on-one type of thing. Again, whatever works for you.

My Best Christmas Present Ever!

“And when they had opened their treasures, they presented gifts to Him: gold, frankincense, and myrrh.” Matthew 2:11 [NKJV]

Christmas is only a few weeks away so I’m getting wish lists from my children and grandchildren. I always know what my husband wants: cold hard cash or a gift certificate from his favorite train store. He has a model train hobby and needs endless cash to sustain it. But this year I might divert and surprise him with something romantic and sentimental.

I’m going way back in my memories today to a certain Christmas in my childhood. I was in grade three and a mere eight years old. I don’t remember which present lay under the tree for me or what I opened Christmas morning but I know I got what I was hoping for.

That was the Christmas I got my mom back.

My mother had been very, very sick. I was sure she was going to die. I heard whispers in church at prayer meeting. I saw the ladies’ pitying looks as they tried to smile at me. Men got up in church and prayed long prayers asking God to spare my mom and make her well.

I didn’t know why my mom was in the hospital. At first I thought she was having another baby but my older sisters assured me it wasn’t so. At home my older siblings and Dad talked quietly not wanting to worry us younger children.

So I prayed. I too asked God to heal my mom and bring her home for Christmas. My family was large. I had thirteen brothers and sisters.

A year or two ago another large family in our church had lost their mom. She died. Their father remarried so the children now had a new mom. I did not want a new mom. I loved my mom. I made all kind of promises to God – good Christian things I would do if only He would bring my mom back home to me from the hospital.

And God did bring my mom home for Christmas but only for a couple of days and then she had to go back for surgery.

But that was enough for me.

As I embraced her I was comforted and was able to let her go again. I believed that because she had been gone once and came back she would come back next time also. I was right. She became even sicker than before but she had her surgery. God healed her and many weeks later she came home to stay. God heard my prayer.

When I think of the wise men laying their treasure of gold and perfumes at Jesus feet that first Christmas season I join with them in adoration.

But that Christmas when I was eight all the wealthy material treasures that the richest kings could have laid at Jesus feet could not have compared to the treasure He gave me – my mother.

This Christmas, I encourage you to remember the special gifts Jesus has given you.